EVENTS

Past Events 2020

The Tattooed Torah (Zoom lecture)

During the Nazi regime in Czechoslovakia, many items of Judaica were confiscated from Jewish communities that had been expelled. These artefacts, including Torah Scrolls,were brought to Prague and each one was given a number. During the Communist regime, the Torah Scrolls were dispersed among Jewish Communities around the world. One of the scrolls that emanated from Brno, reached Chicago, in the U.S. Marvell Ginsburg wrote a children’s book about the scroll, and later an animated film was made, dubbed by Ed Asner.

Speaker: Beth Kopin, daughter of Marvell Ginsburg and producer of the film, and others from the production team.

To watch the lecture –  press here

Jewish Museum in Prague- Lost and found in 20th century (Zoom lecture)

One of the oldest Jewish Museums in Europe, where artefacts are kept since 1906 from the old Jewish Ghetto in Prague. The lecture will elaborate on the history and current activities of the museum which is located next to 4 impressive synagogues.

Speaker: Mgr. Suzanna Pavlovska Ph.D, Director of the Education department of the Jewish Museum in Prague.

To watch the lecture –  press here

The two Propaganda Films made in Theresienstadt Ghetto -1942 and 1944 (Zoom lecure)

The stories of 2 propaganda films, made in attempt to show the world “fake news” about a “Jewish Settlement Region”.

Speaker: Karel Margry, a Dutch historian and writer, one of the founders of the Museum of Dutch Resistance in Amsterdam, researcher of Ghetto Theresienstadt propaganda films and editor of a British quarterly that deals with various aspects of WWll.

To watch the lecture – Press here 

Beit Theresienstadt Annual General Assembly

The annual general assembly of Beit Theresienstadt was held on Monday, July 27th, 2020 at 08:00 p.m.
due to the current situation online through ZOOM.
At the end of the meeting, we hosted Dr. Roubinek, Director of the Terezin Memorial Site in the Czech Republic, for a review on museum activities, innovations and dealing with Covid-19.

Holocaust Memorial Day

This year we faced a situation never experienced before. Due to the Corona pandemic Beit Theresienstadt had to close down.

The stories of the 6 Torch lighters can be seen here.

Virtual Memorial candles for those who perished in the Holocaust were lightened .

Remembrance - Future Generations meeting

On December 31, 2020, a special conference was held at Beit Theresienstadt.

The first, second , third and even fourth generations to Holocaust got together for a joint discussion about the future of Beit Theresienstadt and the way it should commemorate  the Holocaust and Ghetto Theresienstadt story. The roundtable discussions was about the personal responsibility we have in shaping Holocaust memory and the way to do it. MK El’azar Stern, second generation himself, talked about the importance of the Holocaust commemoration.

The meeting ended with beautiful singing of  Shmuel Bloch’s grandson Itamar with Pavel Koren and Zvi Cohen who played the Harmonica.

Family day

On January 31, 2020, a special and exciting meeting was held in Beit Terezin between the students of Shafririm School and members of “Amcha” Netanya (Holocaust survivors ).

As part of the meeting, the students prepared a rich and luxurious breakfast, sat together with the survivors for a talk to hear their stories and finally sang and danced to the sounds of Yehuda Kanias accordion.

International Holocaust Remembrance Day

January 27, 2020

Screening of the movie My German Children by Tom Tamar Pauer.

 

Tom grew up in Israel, the daughter of a Holocaust survivor father and a German mother who had volunteered on Kibbutz Yotvata as penance for the sins of her fathers. Her mother raised three daughters in Israel, but insisted on preserving her identity; at home the language was German and they celebrated Christmas. Like every Israeli child, Tom absorbed Jewish-Israeli traditions through the education system. Her childhood was colored with stories of heroism, memorial ceremonies, and holidays, but the magic was clouded by a sense of not belonging. Tom herself eventually moved to Germany, but after 17 years of raising her own children in Munich, she once again begins to wonder about her roots, her home, and her identity. In this fascinating film, the filmmaker brings her German children to live in Israel for a year. Six-year-old Shira and 15-year-old Daniel go to school and absorb the language and culture. They discover their second identity while Tom goes on a journey to discover her first and to try to bequeath to her children a single, clear identity.